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Full text of "Zoo party : produced by the New York District Chapter, American Institute of Interior Designers to benefit the Cooper Union Museum acquisition fund : Thursday, May 16, 1968, Central Park Zoo"

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OOPER UNION 









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CARPET CORP. 



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DALLAS 

corative Cente: 



LOS ANGELES 
314 N. Robertson Blvd. 



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Antelope, a new arrival; Tiger, Somali Panther. 
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LIBILA.RY OF THE 
COOPER-HEWITT MUSEUM OF DESIGN 

■ SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION • 

Gift 

American Institute 

of Interior Designers 



THE 
SECOND 

ANNUAL 

DECORATIVE 

ARTS 

FESTIVAL 

FOR 

COOPER 

UNION 

MUSEUM 



cm 






ZOO PARTY. 

— / 

produced by 

THE NEW YORK DISTRICT CHAPTER 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE 
OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS 

to benefit 

THE COOPER UNION MUSEUM 
ACQUISITION FUND ^mm,^ 

\ JUL 2 01983 

THURSDAY, MAY 16, 1968 1 CENTRAL PARK ZOO 




AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS 



NEW YORK DISTRICT CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 

ROMAN HEILMAN, PRESIDENT 

JOHN S. ELMO, CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD 

EVELYN COLEMAN, FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 

LLOYD BELL, SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT 

THORNDIKE WILLIAMS, SECRETARY 

HAROLD RAMBUSCH, TREASURER 

THOMAS A. WOODS, ASST, SECRETARY-TREASURER 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

EDWARD DICK 

ELISABETH C. DRAPER 

JAMES G. HENDRIX 

ANDREW J. KRECICKI 

GIDEON LOEWENSTEIN 

RUTH K. LYNFORD 

EDMUND MOTYKA 

KIRK WHITE 

PAUL H. KRAUSS, PRESIDENT-RETIRED 

SUSAN E. MADIGAN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



348255 



zoo PARTY COMMITTEE 



EVERETT BROWN, PAID, BENEFIT CHAIRMAN 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

MR. LLOYD BELL 
MISS MARY DUNN, PAID 
MR. STEPHEN GASPERECZ 
MR. ROMAN HEILMAN 



MRS. RUTH K. LYNPORD 

MRS. ELLEN L. McCLUSKEY, PAID 

MR. EDMUND MOTYKA 

MR. DAREN PIERCE, PAID 



COMMITTEE 



MR. JAMES AMSTER, PAID 

MR. DAVID BARRETT 

MR. DAVID EUGENE BELL 

MRS. ROGER E. BRUNSCHWIG 

MR. YALE R. BURGE 

MISS HARRIET BURKET 

MRS. EVELYN COLEMAN 

MISS INEZ CROOM, PAID 

MRS. ELISABETH C. DRAPER 

MR. JOHN S. ELMO 

MR. DAVID ESKELL-BRIGGS 

MRS. AUDRE FIBER 

MISS ARLENE FRANCIS 

COUNTESS ELSIE GOZZI 

MR. MICHAEL GREER 

MRS. DOROTHY B. HAMMERSTEIN 

MRS. TRUMAN PARKER HANDY 

(List incomplete) 



MRS. LEE HARWOOD 

MRS. WALTER JEFFORDS, JR. 

MISS MELANIE KAHANE, PAID 

MR. PAUL H. KRAUSS 

MR. AND MRS. TOM LEE 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES LEHMAN 

MRS. FRANCIS HENRY LENYGON 

MR. J. FREDERIC LOHMAN 

MR. JEROME I. MANASHAW 

MR. EDMUND MOTYKA 

MISS MARGARET D. NELSON 

MR. WILLIAM PAHLMANN, PAID 

MR. HAROLD W. RAMBUSCH 

MRS. JANET LUCE REYNOLDS 

MISS RUTH L. STRAUSS 

MR. L RAYMOND TOUCHER, PAID 

MRS. CORNELIA VAN SICLEN 

MR. JOHN B. WISNER, PAID 



JUNIOR COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



MISS MAUREEN McCLUSKEY 
MISS SHARON McCLUSKEY 



HONORARY CHAIRMAN 



MR. HENRY FRANCIS du PONT 



HONORARY PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

MRS. LYNDON BAINES JOHNSON 

THE HONORABLE NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER & MRS. ROCKEFELLER 

THE HONORABLE JOHN V. LINDSAY & MRS. LINDSAY 

THE HONORABLE JACOB K. JAViTS & MRS. JAVITS 



Patrons and Patronesses 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER BEINECKE, JR. 

MR, AND MRS. THOMAS S. BUECHNER 

MRS. OWEN R. CHEATHAM 

MR. RENE d'HARNONCOURT ' 

MR. ALBERT I. EDELMAN 

MR. HARRY D. M. GRIER 

MR. AND MRS. AUGUST HECKSCHER 

MR. AND MRS. A. A. HOUGHTON, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS P. F. HOVING 

DR. RICHARD HOWLAND 

MR. PHILIP C. JOHNSON 

MR. AND MRS. WM. E. KATZENBACH 

DR. AND MRS. GRAYSON L. KIRK 

MR. AND MRS. S. DILLON RIPLEY, II 

MR. CHRISTIAN ROHLFING 

MRS. HOWARD J. SACHS 

MR. HARVEY SMITH 

MRS. T. REED VREELAND 

MRS. VANDERBILT WEBB 

(List incomplete) 



Cooper Union, which was founded in 1859 by Peter 
Cooper as a private tuition-free college of art and engi- 
neering, houses not only the Great Hall in which Lincoln 
gave an address which played a vital role in his rise to 
national greatness, but also the Museum of Decorative 
Arts, one of the finest in the world. It was founded in 1897 
by two of Mr. Cooper's granddaughters who assembled 
the original collection. Among the many items of historical 
significance are textiles, furniture, drawings, ceramics, 
lace and embroidery and metalwork. Its library is re- 
nowned among art historians, decorators and designers 
and is used extensively for research. 

The Museum will be moving to a new location on upper 
Fifth Avenue opposite Central Park under its new Smith- 
sonian Institution aegis. The Museum's Decorative Arts 
Collection will be housed there in greatly expanded quar- 
ters facilitating its use by students and designers as a 
research center of the decorative arts. It is the privilege 
of the New York District Chapter of the American Institute 
of Interior Designers to sponsor this benefit for Cooper 
Union Museum's Acquisition Fund to enable the Museum 
to purchase new treasures. 




WHO'S ZOO? 










an assemblage of birds 

and beasties from the Cooper 

Union Museum Collection 




7 



^^4 





ELEPHANT MOUNTED AS CANDLEHOLDER 

The rarity of elephants in 18th-century Europe made these animals the object of great curiosity and 
appealing subjects for artisans of the period. The charming, surprisingly svelte mini-pachyderm (6%" 
high X 43/4" long) shown here, balancing on a handsomely wrought French fire-gilt bronze mounting, 
is one of a pair of covered candleholders. This elephant is made of hard-paste porcelain, the secret of 
which had been sought for centuries and finally achieved when a German alchemist, Johann Friedrich 
Bottger discovered how to produce the highly prized material. The Meissen factory established in 1710 
gave the objects made there its name. A fitting accessory for the desl< or table of a connoisseur, the 
piece was a gift to Cooper Union Ivluseum by Joseph F. McCrindle in memory of Edith M. Feder. 



DOG IN FLOWERED DRESSING GOWN, LACE CAP 

Dressing up a dog is not a 20th-century prerogative. Before tine turn of the century 
elaborate, even flirtatiously caparisoned dogs were preserved for posterity in pottery 
and faience. An amusing example of at-home attire for a well-dressed Fido is shown 
in tin-enameled earthenware by Emile Gall6. The protruding glass eyes and bared 
lower teeth give fair warning that despite the blue wrap-around flowered dressing 
gown with black lace cuffs and matching tied-under-the-chin lace cap no remarks 
will be tolerated. Galle who was well known for his glass and furniture designs also 
produced many fantastic birds and animals in faience in his workshop at Nancy be- 
tween 1870 and 1880. The fine clay body and tasteful coloring is a characteristic of 
Galle's work. An anonymous gift to the Museum. It is ^2V'^" high, 9" long. 





"LE GROS POISSON NOIR"— PICASSO 

Since his first visit in 1 946 to the ceramics studio of Georges and Suzanne Ramie 
in Vallauris in southern France, Picasso has been an enthusiastic ceramacist, both 
modeling and decorating all types of pieces from vases to casseroles and plates. 
His designs always spring from the shape of the object giving the finished prod- 
uct a totality which is as alive, amusing and imaginative as the maitre himself. For 
this piece, named appropriately enough "Le Gros Poisson Noir," Picasso used a 
stock shape of red clay and worked in the incised slip technique producing an apt 
motif for a large, round dish. The reverse side, as decorative as the front, has a 
pattern of whimsical graffito faces, his signature and the date. The dish, a gift of 
Mr, and Mrs. Daniel Saidenberg, is MVa" in diameter. 



CAT LICKING HIND PAW 

Looking more like tlie pampered pet of a Queen of the Nile than an Oriental 
tabby, this charming ceramic cat is a fine example of the workmanship of Japa- 
nese craftsmen in the late 19th century. Probably made for export to America, 
when Western interest in Japanese culture and artifacts was highly accelerated 
after Commodore Perry's missions to Japan in 1853-54 opened up that country to 
western trade, the cat is made of hard, closely grained pottery with a finely 
crackled glaze in tan and brown with gold streakings which relates the piece to 
Kyoto kilns in a style reminiscent of Satsuma ware. The lively character with which 
Japanese craftsmen can endow animals, as well as the finely detailed enameling 
at which the Japanese are so adept, are beautifully illustrated in this piece given 
to Cooper Union Museum by J. Lionberger Davis. The height 3V2" x AVi" long. 





PEACOCK GARDEN WALLPAPER BY WALTER CRANE 

The essence of the art nouveau taste is illustrated in this wallpaper "The Peacock Garden" 
designed by Walter Crane in 1889 and produced by Jeffrey & Co. It Illustrates the decorative use of 
the flamboyant bird as a design motif, a symbol of beauty since ancient times. Crane had used the 
peacock In his Illustrations for children's books and in earlier wallpaper designs. Crane's skillful devel- 
opment of the serpentine line and curvilinear movement served as a source of inspiration for designers 
of the period who were working in the style. The soothing and restful combination of colors — mellowed 
blues, greens and browns In "The Peacock Garden"— were much admired and copied by Crane's 
contemporaries. His controlled use of the undulating line made him a leader of an ordered approach to 
the art nouveau style. This sample given by Grace Lincoln Temple, is 31%" long by 21%" wide. 




PITCHER IN SHAPE OF PARROT 



Many beguiling bird and animal forms of glazed pottery were made in tfie small ceramic workshops of 
central Europe in the second half of the 18th and early part of the 19th centuries. Strongly influenced 
by more sophisticated pieces from the great manufacturers in Strasbourg, Delft, Sceaux and Hochst, 
tureens and other covered vessels were often inspired by Chinese ceramics. The pretty Polly pitcher 
here, one of a pair, has a spout and mouth concealed by a removable upper half of the bird's head. 
The generous handle is formed by the branch on which the bird perches. The strong colors, yellows, 
blues, greens and browns in the glaze, and forthright quality of the coarse clay body, is further empha- 
sized by Polly's bold and roving eye. This piece, circa late 18th century, is believed to be a product of 
one of the many provincial workshops of Moravia, an area now part of Czechoslovakia. It is a bequest of 
Georgiana L. McClellan. It is lOVa" high; BVe" long. 




MING DYNASTY HERALDIC DEVICE 



The exquisite 15th-century Ming Dynasty badge of honor, originally from the famous 
collection of Miquel y Badia, shows snowy white egrets poised with spread wings 
against a golden sl<y. Attenuated fleecy cloud bands have subtle red, blue and yellow 
shadows. Mandarin squares, employing various paired birds as emblems, were used as 
heraldic devices for Chinese civil officials of certain rank while military officials wore 
squares with animal designs. The right to wear robes with these insignia was bestowed 
by the Emperor. One authority suggests that the birds were intended to symbolize the 
literary elegance of the wearer; animals represented the fierce courage of the warrior. 
The square shown here is woven in silk and gold in a tapestry technique known in 
China as "k'o-ssu." It was a gift to the Museum from J. Pierpont Morgan. 



A WROUGHT IRON DOOR KNOCKER IN THE SHAPE OF A DOG 

A wrought iron door knocker from Spain in the shape of an elongated, rather sullen looking dog with 
pointed ears and mouth open indicates that this suspicious guardian of his master's domain is on the 
alert for friend or foe. A heavily incised collar reflects the decorations on the dog's back and chest. 
Arc-like incisions down his back might well be raised hackles. Early adornments for the doors of great 
houses continue to be considered decorative accents on doors. Antique knockers such as this one 
are prized for today's architecture. Excellent reproductions and original designs are also available in 
many designs and materials. The dog knocker was purchased in memory of Jacques Seligmann for the 
Museum Collection. It is 6" high x 8%" long. 




HAND MANGLE 

As decorative as it was practical, a hand-carved IStti-century 
mangling board, its well-worn handle in the form of a taut, elon- 
gated horse is adorned with flowers and small, prancing steeds 
on each shoulder. The board itself is carved, in relief depicting 
the coat of arms of the city of Amsterdam, a leaping stag, birds, 
flowering plants and an appropriate inscription, "NET GEVOVWE 
1ST SIERAET VAN LONGE VROWE" which can be translated - 
"Neat folding is an ornament of a young woman" — surely an 
inspiration to any bride. Unlike most northern European wooden 
articles for home use, Dutch pieces were not decorated with hand 
painting. Dark oak was much favored for the rather elaborate hand 
carving. Pieces such as this wooden mangle made stunning wall 
decorations when not in use and were effective contrasts to the 
copper and pewter utensils hung on the whitened plaster walls 
of Dutch interiors. Given to the Museum by Mrs. A. Murray 
Young. The mangle is 231/2" xeVs". 





BIRD-SHAPED VESSEL WITH STIRRUP SPOUT 

Animal and vegetable life as well as human representations provided inspiration for the characteristic pottery of 
the Chlmu civilization, a pre-Colombian culture that flourished on the northern coast of Peru from about 1200 
A.D. until shortly before 1470 A.D. Actually a revival from the monochrome ware of the earlier Mochica culture, 
the vessels were shaped in sections on molds from which several Impressions could be made. Spouts were luted 
to the body then refined into the main part of the vessel by smoothing and detailing the surface. The toucan-like 
beak, upthrust square tail and rounded wings of this splendid example accentuate the ovoid quality of the vessel. 
In addition to pottery, the Chimu culture left superlative examples of metalwork, textiles and featherwork. Pur- 
chased in memory of Charles W. Gould. It is 974 " high; 8%" long. 



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■IIIIIHnilBIIIBIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIHIIIIIBIIttlBI 


■iiiin 


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NTER OR DESIGN 




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FLINTKOTE 



THE FLINTKOTE COMPANY • 480 Central Ave., East Rutherford, N. J. 07073 • P.O. Box 2218, T.A., Los Angeles, Calif. 90054 

From the FLINTKOTE Floor Fashion Collection-including exclusive Peel and Stick tile and many colorful uinyl asbestos styles. 




WALK-EASE Flooring is installed in the baby elephant's cage in the zoo at 6 Flags Over Georgia. 



DECORATION & DESIGN BUILDING 

979 Third Avenue , New York, New York 10022 




C-S-L 



Your leading resource for original 
styling in Sleepsofas and versatile 
modular units of every description 
. . . Ideal for your custom contract 
and residential requirements! 



Contemporary Tuxedo Sleepsofa 

with inverted seams and waterfall cushions 

combined into the luxury look of C-S-L. 

SLEEPSOFAS/SOFAS/CHAIRS/MODULAR UNITS 
... for those who demand the finest 



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Possibly the most elegant assemblage 
of contemporary furniture in all the world 

Directional 

New York: 979 Third Av., Decoration & Design B'Idg. • Chicago: 6-121 Merchandise Mart 



S. A. BENDHEIM CO., INC. 
122 Hudson Street 
NewYork, N.Y. 10013 
Phone: 226-6370 

ANTIQUE GLASS 
Glass Specialties 



NESLE, INC. 
151 East 57th St. 
NewYork, N.Y. 10022 
PLaza 5-0515 



ROMAN YARD 

JOSEPH L. ROMAN, AID 

WOODSTOCK, NEW YORK 



GARDEN STATE METAL 
SPINNING & STAMPING CORP. 
has the proven personnel equipment 
and experience to produce quality 
lighting equipmentforyou the 
Original Equipment Manufacturer. 

We are an independent facility . . . NOT 
affiliated directly or indirectly with any other 
lighting manufacturer in the industry. 

Contact us now on your specific 
requirements. 



10th & Grand St., Hoboken, N. J. 07030 
Phone: (201)656-3000 



ARTHUR H. LEE & SONS INC. 

\Neavers and Importers of 

Fine Decorating Fabrics 

and 

JOFA INC. 

Artisans of Fine Decorative Fabrics 

Showrooms: 
227 East 56th Street 
NewYorl<,N.Y. 10022 
Telephone: (212) 889-3900 

New York I Atlanta I Boston 
Chicago I Dallas I Los Angeles 
Philadelphia I San Francisco I London 



Compliments of 

VICRTEX SALES DIVISION 
L. E. Carpenter & Company 
40 East 53rd Street 
New York, N. Y. 10022 

Quality Vinyl Wallcoverings 



PAUL ASSOCIATES, INC. 
155 East 55th Street 
NewYork, N.Y.I 0022 
PLaza 5-1313 

Bathroom Accessories 
and Distinctive Hardware 



CAMILLE & 

CHARLES LEHMAN, AID 




8,000 FABRICS MAKE A COLLECTION THAT BEARS WATCHING 
FOR ITS TIMELESS ELEGANCE IN WEAVES AND PRINTS . . . 



STROHEIM&ROMANN 



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Showrooms: 

155 EAST 56TH ST., NEW YORK 
BOSTON; PHILADELPHIA 
CLEVELAND; MIAMI; CHICAGO 
DALLAS; LOS ANGELES 
AND SAN FRANCISCO. 



Something old, 
Something new, 
Something imported 
And domestic, too! 

Here's but a sample of 
the extensive line on 
display at our showrooms. 
Exclusive designs, antiques, 
unusual imports, one-of- 
a-kinds . . . tole, wrought 
iron, brass,^ pewter, bronze, 
crystal ... in traditional, 
provincial, contemporary 
and modern . . . over 1,000 
fixtures to choose from ! 



Have we missed anything? You name it . 
we probably have it. 





Come to Metropolitan . 
where lighting is 
a work of art! 




"Where Wonderful Things 
Are Happening To Wallpaper" 

New York Showroom • 979 Third Avenue • 755-4782 



METROPOLITAN 

LIGHTING FIXTURE CO.. INC. 

1010 Third Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10021 
Tel: 212 TE 8-2425 




Compliments of 



GLORIA AND JACK ISAACS 




Custom Furniture 
and Draperies 





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117 EAST 29th STREET, NEW YORK 16, NEW YORK 
LExington 2-0579 




THE TOTAL HOME SHOWCASE LOOKS 



FORWARD TO WELCOMING THE COOPER UNION 



MUSEUM AS ONE OF THEIR MOST HONORED AND 



DISTINGUISHED INSTITUTIONAL EXHIBITORS AT 



THE NEW YORK COLISEUM, SEPTEMBER 20TH 



THROUGH THE 29TH, 1968. 



American Home and Better Living Expositions, Inc. 

507 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 10022/(212) PL 9-6910 



tUtlH VINYL FLOOR TILE 




SHOWROOMS: 979 THIRD AVE., NEW YORK, N.Y. • 8899 BEVERLY BOULEVARD, LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 




FABRICS INC. 

clxcULilve JUraperif ana Hpnoldler^ Zraorici 

979 THIRD AVENUE • NEW YORK, N. Y. 10022 



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OUR SPECIAL THANKS FOR 

COVER DESIGN 

JEREMIAH GOODMAN 

WRITER 

MARY 0. BURKE 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 

CAROLYN BARTEL 

COOPER UNION MUSEUM STAFF 

ENTERTAINMENT 

NANCY DUSSAULT 
"BROADWAY MUSICAL STAR" 



We break our molds. Don't look to American Needlecrafts 

for a long line of look-alikes. Custom creation is 

remembering that good taste comes in assorted preferences, 

To satisfy them we dare to think fresh, 
Caring makes us daring. 



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A/ew york: D & D Building, 979 Third Avenue (or 59tli Street entrance), New York, N.Y. 10022/ (212) 679-1922 
/.OS Angeles: Albert Parvin & Co., Robertson Plaza, 120 North Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90048/ (213) 652-5760 

BEDSPREADS/ DRAPERIES/FABRICS/COMFORTERS/ BLANKET COVERS 
DECORATIVE PILLOWS/CUT VELVETS/WINDOW TREATMENTS 

American Needlecrafts Inc., member of Bonnie Industries/ Bonnie Looms/ Bonnie Slipcover / Bonnie Pillow/ Bonnie Brass 

KODEL® polyester fiberfill used exclusively 



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